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Full text of "Alexander von Humboldt"

290                              LIFE OF
domestic aspect- Humboldt is entirely at home, and
more amiable than ever. With Schiller he is quite
imconstrained, and sometimes as witty and comical as
we have ever seen him. Ton may think, also, how-
interesting it is, when, instead of cutting short and
trivializing' everything, he has always the desire to
express himself; when he, instead of combating his
opponent in something not to the point; always
keeps to the subject, when he esteems truth itself as
much in words as in thought; I mean, when he does
not too soon break off his opinions, or maintain them
too long, from contempt for the opinions of the
other/'
Very soon afterwards Goethe joined the friendly
union subsisting- between. Humboldt and Schiller.
The inducement aaid occasion was the origination,
of a journal, "Die Horen/* an undertaking which
Schiller had projected with the young publisher,
Gotta, in Tubingen, and which was carried into exe-
cution in Jena.
" Die Horen/* were to enlist the co-operation of the
principal writers and thinkers of Germany, and by an
"uninterrupted series of valuable contributions from
them in prose and verse, were to form a never-
before seen testimony of the literary advancement of
the age, and the means for its further development.
Schiller was well qualified for directing such an under-
taking, but the time w&s not appropriate, the public
too apathetic, and the real members, and their regular
contributions, too few, to support the journal for more
than a few years. Besides, only the numbers issued
in the first, and part of the second year, fulfil the high
promise of its commencement.
BDumboldt's interest in this journal was a very con-
siderable one, and Schiller valued him as one of his
most able coadjutors. In his application to Goethe
to join their "undertaking, dated 13th June, 1794, he
speaks in the name of those already associated, and
that in Jena^ Humboldt, Kchte, and Woltmann
fead undertaken to superintend Hie publication of the